Tutorial – Shooting Panoramas with the X100 at Bear Mtn Ranch

I’ve mentioned in a couple of recent posts that I’m really enjoying my Fuji X100, and I think I dig it even more now that I’ve played around a bit with its cool panorama shooting mode.  Since others out there might be interested in seeing how this function works on the X100, I threw together a short video tutorial on using it.  You can find the finished photograph that came out of that early morning shoot at Bear Mtn Ranch further down on this post.

 

I’m pretty happy with the way it came out, though I noticed, in post processing, that there were a couple of blurred spots (you can see it in the sign above the gate) because I shot this at 1/60th of a second and was panning a bit too quickly.

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show hide 5 comments

September 4, 2011 - 23:14

Wayne Frost Nice tutorial, Jacques. The x100 pano function is pretty impressive.

September 6, 2011 - 07:24

Jan Winther Wow, thats a really cool function. Instant panorama – very cool.

Thanks for taking the time, Jacques

September 9, 2011 - 12:08

Luís dos Santos good tutorial Jaques! would never have thought it would be so easy to do a panorama with the X100. It seems that you’re not using a nodal point adapter. Did you noticed any stitching artifacts in the final panoramas?

September 9, 2011 - 12:39

Jacques Thanks, Luís. I did not use a nodal point adaptor, and only spotted issues with a bit of blurring on the letters of the sign on top of the gate. I shot a 180 degree pano the other day and had similar success, though leaving the camera on Aperture priority produced some vertical lines where the exposure shifts can be seen. Keeping the camera on full manual settings would probably have solved this issue. I do have a Really Right Stuff panorail (the nodal adaptor you mentioned) so I plan to mount the camera to that the next time I play with the pano function to see what that produces.

October 31, 2012 - 06:40

Giuseppe Fallica The X100 is superb. But to generate good images without artifacts, I had to buy a nodal point adapter: purchase necessary. What I do not understand is why manufacturers don’t place the “tripod input” under the nodal point by default: in fixed focal leng camera it would seem a obviousness…!

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