Live together, die alone…

Here we go again, waking up in the middle of the night and feeling I’ve something to say.  So here goes:  The more time I spend here in the D.C. metro, the more I become aware of a disturbing trend I see around me… SELFISHNESS to the point of destruction.  Let me be more specific.  Driving in to work each morning, I’m shocked by the number of people who seem to purposefully block drivers trying to enter the main road from a side street. What’s up with that?  Are we in a race here?  Is this part of that self-entitlement I’ve heard so much about.  But that’s merely the tip of the ice berg.  I’m pretty sure (and certainly not the first to note) it is this self-above-all-else attitude that has contributed to many things we complain about every day, whether that is the unhealth of our environment, of our faltering economy, or the tarnishing of our country’s reputation as a beacon of hope, freedom and justice.  Somehow it got me to thinking of Jack’s admonition to the survivors in the TV Show ‘Lost’, “Live together, die alone…”  Seriously, is there something wrong with working as one for a common good?  It works for the Marines, so let it be for us.  So here’s what I’m asking you to do today (we’re starting small here):  When you’re out rushing to or from the work or whatever, YIELD to at least one person trying to merge into your lane.  How does that feel?  Not bad, huh. Kinda cool to put another ahead of yourself, even in something you consider trivial.  Lather, rinse, repeat!

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November 23, 2011 - 04:25

Mark Blundell Nice image. I think that attitude is similar in many cities unfortunately. . .

November 23, 2011 - 06:58

RobertB Cool shot from dark to daylight. I live near Toronto, and the norm is to block drivers trying to enter, either from driveways or artery roads. When I was working in Richmond, VA for a short time I was literally shocked that drivers could be so courteous, stopping to let you enter in front of them. Not something I was accustomed to.

November 23, 2011 - 08:21

Jacques Gentlemen. I really appreciate those comments.

RobertB: Your observations match precisely my experiences when comparing the couple of months I spend in Redding, CA and along historic Route 66 (people so friendly, I thought they were psychotic) with my return to the D.C. metro area. I’m certain that being in Redding had a HUGE impact on my behavior, as did my travels on Route 66. I refuse to fall back into the routine of anger and selfishness. I’m done with that; feels a heck of a lot better the Redding way!

November 23, 2011 - 09:53

chrisdmrf Nice sentiment Jacques. I do try to let other people in but tend to get more bullish if they try to force their way in front of me without so much as indicating first.
Love the shot, very moving.

November 23, 2011 - 11:20

Eric Another magnificent shot! I love the mix of light and dark. I also completely agree about how people have become so inconsiderate and self-absorbed. I suppose we can’t all quit our day jobs to help old ladies across the street, BUT we can all easily do a few nice things for other people and just show some common courtesy. Every little bit helps. Great post!

November 23, 2011 - 13:57

LensScaper It’s just as bad in the UK, I’m sad to report. When it is severe and people get agitated we call it “Road Rage”. On a lighter note – a great title for this image

November 23, 2011 - 23:20

Chris Robins amen brother jacques. i am yielding. and it feels good. amen.

November 24, 2011 - 03:51

bob emmerich Seriously, is there something wrong with working as one for a common good?
Can you speak to some of those folks on the Hill?

…. put another ahead of yourself
Amen!

November 24, 2011 - 04:50

Jacques ChrisDMRF: Yeah, it’s tough to “turn the other cheek”, at it were, when someone does that to you. My wife can tell you, I was one of those a$$hats for years!! Thankfully, I’ve gotten over myself and it feels awesome. Thanks for the compliment on the photo.

Eric: Very well said!

Lensscaper: Thanks, mate! Yeah, we have road rage here as well. I remember years ago here in the USA, it would sometimes involve gun play. Scary. I myself had been involved in “road rage” many years ago, actually chasing a guy down once to confront him. I was an angry guy, for sure.

Chris R, my brotha! Glad to hear that, man!!! And it gets easier and easier everyday!! Keep me posted and lets skype or talk on the phone soon.

Hi Bob Emmerech: I’d love noting more than to influence at least one person on the Hill to put another ahead of personal interest. I believe there is hope out there for a better world, even if by better it means just one person embraces love and humility!

November 26, 2011 - 20:20

Edith Levy Great post Jacques. It’s the same in Canada …you’re not alone. This is an awesome shot.

November 28, 2011 - 14:09

Rob Hanson Hey, Br. Jacques —

I, for one, like it when you ‘have something to say.’

The phenomenon you speak of is the result of people creating a schism between the “I-in-here” and the “world-out-there.” Having neatly drawn a dividing line between the two, they can then see the rest of the world as an assault on their closely held sense of ego. (That’s a gross oversimplification… it’s complicated.)

What most don’t seem to realize is that there is not an “I” in here versus “others” out there; we’ve lost our sense of connectivity with all that’s arising in Consciousness. There are many reasons why this has happened, but a lot of it has to do with the culture that we’re living in. No single thought occurs to us without being steered by the imprint of our personal background and the soup we swim in.

Until we reclaim our connection to the rest of the world, it will continue to be a Die Alone situation — sadly — and I’m concerned that it will take a major upheaval to get the scales off of our eyes.

There is hope, but I don’t think it will be won easily. What we do have to do is, as you say, yield to one other in the interests of working for the common good.

November 28, 2011 - 20:38

Jacques Edith: Thank, you! Sorry to hear it’s not any better in your neck of the woods.

Hey Rob: Awesome comments, bud. I suppose that’s just life, these days. But, at least we don’t have to play along if we don’t want to, eh?

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